Saturday, 29 February 2020

AU Bushfire Appeal (NSW Rural Fire Service)

To help the firefighting and recovery effort against the Australian bushfire crisis, now when you trade-in or sell to CeX in-store (online coming soon) you can choose to donate some or the entire value of your items to the NSW Rural Fire Service. 

For more info on who they are and the amazing work they do visit www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/about-us and to find your local CeX store and make a donation visit webuy.com/stores If you choose to donate through CeX, we will pass your donation on in full with no deductions. 

If you choose to donate 100% of your item’s value, then we will add a further 10% to your donation.
Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Rubik's Cubes for Muscular Dystrophy UK

Get everyone's favourite cube puzzle for a great cause!


CeX has teamed up with Muscular Dystrophy UK to offer official MDUK Rubik's Cube Keyrings* in aid of the charity for a donation of £2.50.


To date, you have helped CeX raise 
OVER £150,000
for Muscular Dystrophy UK.

Muscular Dystrophy UK supports and helps fund research to aid the estimated 70,000 people living with muscle-wasting conditions in the UK. When you sell to CeX in-store or online you can choose to donate all or part of the proceeds to any of our chosen charity partners. We will pass your donation on in full with no deductions. If you choose to donate 100% of your item’s value, then we will add a further 10% to your donation.


To find your local CeX store and make a donation visit webuy.com/stores 

*Available in selected stores only.
A minimum donation of £2.50 is required per Rubik's Cube Keyring.
Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Monday, 17 February 2020

1917 ★★★★☆


At its heart, 1917 is a film about the horrors of war. No more, no less, it’s a cold look at life during WWI, with a dose of action and the trappings of a thriller to keep the heart pumping throughout.

Lance Cpl. Schofield (George MacKay) and Lance Cpl. Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman) are tasked with travelling over no-man's land in an effort to stop 1600 of their fellow soldiers from walking into a German trap. They’re given little to no chance of success before setting off on their suicide mission, and they quickly form an easy little brother/big brother team. In real life, the former has more acting credits and is visibly the eldest of the two. The latter was last seen (by me, anyway) chucking himself off The Red Keep in Game of Thrones, but I didn’t actually realise he was formerly Tommy B until I double-checked the cast list to write this very review.


The main duo is backed up by a supporting cast that is a who’s who of primetime British talent, taking time off from earning a BBC paycheck to pop in with a posh accent for a couple of minutes. Take Benedict Cumberbatch, for example. He’s billed as one of the main characters, but it would be easy to miss his cameo if you were sending an overly long text message, or ordering a Dominos. The same goes for Rob Stark, (Richard Madden) Moriarty from Sherlock, (Andrew Scott) Merlin and Harry from Kingsman, (Mark Strong & Colin Firth) and Danny from Line of Duty (Daniel Mays). The list is almost endless, and they all could have been used slightly more effectively, or not at all.

Beautiful longshots underscore a visual spectacle, showing the reality of heading into a literal warzone where bodies are left to lie rotting in the dirt, while rats spread diseases and the night sky is lit up like fireworks on New Year's Eve. Sam Mendes certainly managed to capture the confusion of being shot at from somewhere, and I was drawn to the edge of my seat by multiple scenes that ramp up the pressure expertly. 

The film has two simple beats. Brief moments of respite to allow for character building and quick conversations, followed by tense, longer sections where the camera will pan and follow the actors for minutes at a time, as they navigate through enemy territory or attempt to locate something among the chaos. It looks like it was filmed in one massive take, and it’s a sight to behold. It’s a technique that isn’t used often, and it must have been difficult to ensure everything ticked along at the right moment. To that end, 1917 hardly misses a step, wrapping up neatly in just under two hours.


If there’s a message to take from 1917, it’s that nobody on the other side can be trusted. Shellshocked boys are sent to their deaths by men who’ll never step foot on a real battlefield, and it’s a shitty experience all round. Luckily, the audience gets to go home at the end. 


★★★★☆
James Millin-Ashmore



Get your daily CeX at

Instagram Twitter YouTube Facebook

And now Snapchat!

Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Friday, 14 February 2020

Upgrade to the Samsung S20 & save with CeX!


Excited about the new Samsung Galaxy S20 range and the upcoming Z Flip? Might be time to upgrade and take your photography game to the next level with the amazing 108MP camera on the S20 Ultra! You can get instant cash for your old phone today or trade it in & get money off the latest phones at CeX!



Check out some of the phone brands we buy and sell below.

 Apple iPhone 
 Google Pixel 
 Huawei 
 LG 
 Motorola 
 Nokia 
 OnePlus 
Samsung  
 Sony 
 Xiaomi

Can't find yours? Check for your make and model using our futuristic search function HERE. Nice.
Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Thursday, 13 February 2020

Rugby 20 ★★☆☆☆


As sports games go, Rugby 2020 is nowhere near as unpolished as the likes of Handball 17, while it doesn’t feature cash-grab elements seen in popular franchises like FIFA. However, it does have a variety of flaws which hold it back from achieving a higher final score.

The world is bereft of good, licensed rugby games. Developers Eko Software have also worked on small scale projects like the Handball series in the past, so it’s a question of whether they’ve managed to learn from their past mistakes with their shiny new project. There’s a host of supporters out there who would be more than happy to spend time scoring tries with the best players in the world or the biggest teams. (But not England or New Zealand due to licensing issues with the kits.)

Ads have boasted about new “motion-captured animations and completely redesigned player models”, but it’s hard to see what all the fuss is about when you see the game in motion. The average team looks like a group of Uruk-hai who got lost on their way to Isengard, and there’s no way to understate just how ugly everything is. Think Wayne Rooney in a hall of mirrors, or a dog curling out a steamy oval-shaped turd. You just want to turn away, and you don’t want to look them in the eye during the deed. The menus are no better, blasting sickly colours into your retina, while the commentary is ridiculously stilted. It makes PES read like Shakespeare, and I’d advise muting it as soon as possible unless you want to hear the same player’s name again and again for hours on end. You could probably blast it into another country through speakers and have it considered a war crime.


It would be a slight exaggeration to say that I’ve seen more detail from NPCs from the PS3 era, but everything is relative, and the above could be forgiven as long as the gameplay is passable. After all, you’re not exactly spoiled for choice if you need a quick rugby fix on console. Rugby 18 was produced by the same team, and it’s just bad. The gameplay is where a title like this lives or dies, and it’s not exactly the most fluid experience, but it has improved. Whether attacking or defending, guesswork is the main tactic to employ at the beginning, while the engine has suffered with a number of bugs. They’ve moved to a tactical style which makes it more like a sim, and that does add depth in the long term.

Underneath it all, there’s a decent rugby system which is let down by a severe lack of polish. The lack of a AAA budget is clear to see and impacts on everything from questionable AI to low-quality models, while it’s unlikely to convert many new fans to the sport. Regardless, it’s worth picking up on sale if you are interested in eggball, but it could have been released at a lower price to stimulate sales and interest.

A world away from the popularity of the likes of FIFA, NBA, or almost any other major sporting franchise, Rugby 2020 shows that there’s still a place for B+ sports games. Better ones, that have the ability to make new fans. It’ll do for diehard rugger buggers, but others should probably give it a backwards pass. 

★★☆☆☆
James Millin-Ashmore



Get your daily CeX at

Instagram Twitter YouTube Facebook

And now Snapchat!

Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Wednesday, 12 February 2020

Dolittle ★★★☆☆


It feels like all I ever do is review remakes or reimaginings of stories that were far better when I was younger. Am I so out of touch? No, it’s the filmmakers that are wrong.

Imagine you’re Robert Downey Junior, moving on from one of the biggest cinematic experiences the world has ever seen. Like Keanu Reeves after The Matrix, or Daniel Radcliffe when he finally set down his wizard robes for good. There must be a sense of confusion, while a lack of direction is only to be expected after a project which has taken up a decent portion of your life. Downey Jr responded by doing what he does best, diving headfirst into the next big role on the horizon. It’s been a century since the first books about Dr Dolittle were first released, and over 20 since the last set of films. So far, so good, you might think.


However, a number of questionable decisions arise almost instantly. Let’s get the accent out of the way. RDJ has decided to evoke his inner Dirty Sanchez, with a slightly suspicious Welsh tint to his pronunciations. It wasn’t a problem when he took on the role of Sherlock and the accompanying English inflexions, but there’s something strange about his delivery. It’s an uncanny Welsh Valley, but it does help to separate him from other roles. Meanwhile, actual Welshman Michael Sheen plays the English Dr Blair Müdfly, further muddying the waters.

The film begins with the good Doctor living a decidedly reclusive life. Given the lack of human company, Dolittle gets by with a menagerie of animal pals, with many seeing him for a personal problem or two. Dolittle spies a couple of children in his extravagant estate during the intro, in the form of Tommy Stubbins (Harry Collett) who wants to be his apprentice, while Lady Rose (Carmel Laniado) comes with a mission directly from Buckingham Palace. Long story short, the Queen is ill, so Stubbins and Dolittle have to go on an adventure in an attempt to find a journal which could prove to save her life.

Eddie Murphy will always be Dr Dolittle for me, although it could be a mix of nostalgia and the lack of overbearing CGI in the 1998 version that swings it overall. The 2020 edition is still a different take on the story, which is welcomed instead of a shot-for-shot remake of the prior films. While much of the early news discusses the film failing to do well at the box office, it’s not as bad as it’s being made out to be. It’s fairly action-packed, and the humans do most of the heavy lifting with solid performances. The voice acting also takes it up a level, allowing for respite as the action swings between various locations at a moments notice. (Inexplicably, they spend way too much time on a ship that could have been spent elsewhere in an extended travel sequence midway through.


There are a few offhand jokes which do land, and the unexpected ending is better than I could have hoped for. The same is true for the film on the whole, even if it’s really just a vehicle for RDJ in his post-Ironman phase. (Dr Dolittle is also in the public domain, so it’s not like it cost anything to get the rights to the story or characters.)

★★★☆☆
James Millin-Ashmore




Get your daily CeX at

Instagram Twitter YouTube Facebook

And now Snapchat!

Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Tuesday, 11 February 2020

The Gentlemen ★★★★★


The Gentlemen is Guy Ritchie’s latest attempt to glamourise the seedy side of London life, with a tale of villianery that generally manages to match up to the earlier outings in his portfolio. It might not be his magnum opus, but it’s close to his stylish best.

Framed as a conversation about a script between a bent private investigator and a mid-level gangster, Fletcher (Hugh Grant) and Raymond (Charlie Hunnam) discuss the recent exploits of Mickey Pearson (Matthew McConaughey) in The Gentlemen.


Pearson is in the process of selling his vast weed empire which spans the UK, but everything begins to go wrong as he’s about to seal the £200m deal. What follows are the exploits of the baron and his accomplices as they attempt to unfuck things, introducing a range of colourful, violent characters that you wouldn't want to get on the wrong side of. 

Dry Eye (Henry Golding) has a significant role as “the Young Dragon”, while Matthew (Jeremy Strong) is Pearson’s elusive buyer. The same goes for Coach (Colin Farrell) who seems to be channelling his brand of dangerous insensitivity previously seen In Bruges. He looks after a group of MMA fighters called The Toddlers (including Bugzy Malone), and everything quickly begins to unravel as different worlds collide.

You know what you’re going to get with a Guy Ritchie flick starring some of the biggest names in the game, backed by a strong cast of British talent. Of the ensemble, Grant especially seems to revel in playing against type, but there are strong performances all round. McConaughey more than manages to make his mark, seemingly authentic enough to get away with using lingo that probably didn’t fly from his mouth comfortably the first time he read the script.

You’re expected to pay attention at all times, as the story within a story allows for different viewpoints, theories and perspectives, told by a slightly unreliable narrator who clearly has his own agenda. The early dynamic between Fletcher and Raymond is a good setup for the final act, while every loose thread is tied up before the credits roll. Nothing is forgotten, and everything matters.


Despite reaching the big time, there’s no sense that Ritchie has forgotten how to make the films that made him famous. If anything, it’s safer ground than big-budget Disney releases like Aladdin, which don’t necessarily play to his strengths as a storyteller. The Gentlemen is less gritty than the likes of Lock Stock and Snatch, but it’s worth remembering that the latter came out roughly 20 years ago. The sheen is a sign of the two decades that have passed, while Ritchie’s dialogue writing skills are still up there with the very best if you just want to laugh and enjoy the ride.


★★★★★
James Millin-Ashmore



Get your daily CeX at

Instagram Twitter YouTube Facebook

And now Snapchat!

Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Buy and Sell Your E-Scooters at CeX!

Have an unwanted E-Scooter in your garage or always wanted to zip about on one?
CeX has you covered as we now buy and sell a selection of E-Scooters across stores nationwide.


Visit any of our stores to see what we have in stock and to check what you could get for your unwanted E-Scooter!


To find your local CeX store visit webuy.com/stores 


Get your daily CeX at


Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl

Monday, 10 February 2020

Warhammer: Chaosbane ★★★★☆


As a child, I used to collect Warhammer and I used to love painting the tiny figure, melting polystyrene with liquid cement to build decaying castle walls, and enacting battles all by myself. This is because even in the world of socially awkward teens I was socially awkward and could rarely find anyone to play with. Warhammer Chaosbane, a pretty solid Diablo clone, lets me re-experience that feeling, by having a satisfying single-player mode, and either a terrible matchmaking system or a huge lack in other people wanting to play with me. Sigh. Just like old times.


I played Chaosbane as Elessa, the not-too-posh to-mosh wood elf with a hunger for vengeance, a thick (and very fake English accent) that is so adept with bows and arrows that she could skewer Robin Hood, Legolas and Hawkeye through the brain before they had the chance to do the arrow- through-the-arrow thing that they love. 

The plot of Chaosbane is not wonderful, it had the status effect of boring me to death slowly like a poisoned Cox's Pippin, and I am lore hungry most of the time. I found myself listening to French History podcasts instead of paying attention after Act II, and French History isn't something I give an old merde about. However, if you like isometric Diablo-em-ups AND love Warhammer lore, then this might tickle your testes a bit more firmly than it did mine. 

The graphics are very gorgeous and the gameplay though addictive was not cynically done, it didn't feel designed to keep me addicted like Candy Crush is, more like it was a solid bit of game and I wouldn't mind going back for more. Which by coincidence, is exactly how I feel about your mum. Some of the skills I developed over time were ludicrously fun to perform, and maybe this is because I've been playing a lot of retro games recently, but the lack of frame rate issues while throwing a Robert Welch around me, killing a million orcs and gretchins in the process, was lovely. 

The acting, the music, the plot and the standard enemies are lacklustre and functional but nothing memorable. The 'rare' loot appeared so frequently that I got a trophy for fully kitting myself out in rare armour in just a few hours, so it would have been nice to have an element of challenge here, as no reward ever felt like a reward. 

A lot of the mechanics were closed off to me until later in the game and I'd been pointlessly collecting these Jolly Rancher looking things for three acts (out of four) before being able to use them to upgrade anything. I also ended the game (that I sped through) at level 43 and it has a level 50 cap, so it's not gonna force you to grind but it did leave me feeling a little short-changed.


The gameplay and the bosses, however, are fantastic, the bosses are a mixture between a standard RPG bastard and a Bullet-Hell twat (thanks to Skyforce for the training) and though they boil down to "Avoid the stuff and hit the thing", I found them exactly as difficult as I would have wanted them to be. 

I could talk for days, or 717 words at least, on the weak points of Warhammer: Chaosbane. If I'm honest I think its a great game, though I'm not really sure why. The four acts that make up the four very endlessly traversed maps are functional and the boss rush, expeditions etc. are not enough endgame for me. However, as an isometric dungeon crawler, it was a wild ride, and it isn't even a full-price game. 

For the time I'm willing to put into a game that is outside my preferred genre, the 10 hours or so was enough, and I feel like Warhammer fans will be glad to see the first good Warhammer game since Shadow of the Horned Rat on the PSone whereas Diablo fans would love this to bridge the gap until they make a good one again. 

Overall, if you're staring at your box of Diablo 3 sandwiched between Sacred 2 and 3, and you want something new that is basically exactly the same but not quite as good, Warhammer: Chaosbane, is worth your time. 

★★★★☆
David Roberts



Get your daily CeX at

Instagram Twitter YouTube Facebook

And now Snapchat!

Digg Technorati Delicious StumbleUpon Reddit BlinkList Furl Mixx Facebook Google Bookmark Yahoo
ma.gnolia squidoo newsvine live netscape tailrank mister-wong blogmarks slashdot spurl